Archive for the ‘Lobato school funding lawsuit’ category

Thursday’s Supreme Court hearing on school funding may lead to legislative action on long term problem

March 8, 2013

On March 7, The Colorado Supreme Court heard oral arguments on the State’s appeal of the December 2011 decision that Colorado’s public school funding system is unconstitutional. CEA and other public school funding advocates hope the Court’s decision in the Lobato lawsuit will be the turning point in a decades-long effort to achieve adequate, sustainable K-12 education funding.

In the state’s highest court this week, attorneys for the plaintiffs in the Lobato case – students, parents, and school districts – argued that the December 2011 Denver District Court ruling be upheld. The State of Colorado argued that the Supreme Court should reject the ruling and, in essence, leave school funding just as it is today.

In the lower court, Judge Sheila Rappaport found, after a lengthy trial, that Colorado’s public school funding system is “irrational, arbitrary, and severely underfunded” and violates the State Constitution. Key findings in her decision are on the Children’s Voices web site.

Judge Rappaport ordered the State to design, fund, and implement a system of public school funding which guarantees that all students graduate with the knowledge and skills they need for citizenship, postsecondary education, and the workforce. This work falls to the Colorado Legislature.

Kathy Gebhardt, plaintiffs’ legal counsel, said, “This case has been ongoing for eight years. During that time, the violation of Colorado children’s constitutional rights has continued: school budgets have been cut, mandates added, class sizes increased, school hours decreased, student populations increased, and the number of teachers decreased. The trial court, after hearing evidence for five weeks, found that the current system of school finance is not only unconstitutional, but unconscionable.”

CEA and other education organizations have helped fund the plaintiffs’ legal work through the non-profit Children’s Voices. It’s worth your time to look at the Children’s Voices site, where you can follow the case for changing Colorado’s system of school funding.

The Supreme Court will likely issue its decision by the end of 2013.

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